Hasselblad H6D 100MP medium format camera announced

Hasselblad has announced the H6D medium format camera that features a Sony-made 100-megapixel image sensor.

Hasselblad’s H6D range has been completely rebuilt with new technical components and an all new electronic platform. The new medium-format lineup, offering the H6D-100c with 100MP CMOS sensor and 4K video along with the H6D-50c with 50MP CMOS sensor.

The H6D medium format system offers a new, faster processor, a 3″ 920k-dot touchscreen monitor, dual card slots, built-in Wi-Fi and USB 3.0 connectivity. The new models feature a wider range of shutter speeds from 60 minutes to 1/2000th of a second, increased ISO range and a faster shooting rate along with a USB 3.0 Type-C connector.

Additional information for the Hasselblad H6D medium format camera range can be found on dedicated page. The Hasselblad H6D-50c will cost $25,995 and the the H6D-100c is priced at $32,995.

Hasselblad H6D 100MP medium format camera announced

Hasselblad announces 100MP H6D-100c capable of 4K, H6D-50c 50MP


Hasselblad H6D promo videos:


Hasselblad H6D will compete against the Phase One XF which has been introduced back in January 2016. The medium format camera features an 100-megapixel CMOS sensor with a 15-stop dynamic range. It supports long-exposures of up to 60 minutes and has a maximum ISO sensitivity of 12800.

The Hasselblad H6D-100c offers an impressive 100MP 53.4 x 40mm CMOS sensor to produce high-resolution stills as well as UHD 4K video.

The Sony-made 100-megapixel image sensor affords a wide sensitivity range of ISO 64-12800, along with 16-bit color depth and a dynamic range of up to 15 stops to maintain notable detail and quality when working in the most difficult of lighting conditions. With 50MP the H6D-50c claims 14 stops of dynamic range and is capable of 2.5 fps continuous shooting.

In addition to high-resolution stills shooting, the H6D can also record both UHD 4K and Full HD 1080p video at 30 fps. Video can be saved in the proprietary Hasselblad RAW format, which can be converted to the edit-friendly Apple ProRes format using Phocus 3.0 software.